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UK Customs & Global Trade update - Week 27

All the new laws and rules about UK customs and international trade are in one blog post. Compliance made easy. You can be sure that you won't miss any important news.



Content

  • CDS: Urgent Appeal to British Businesses to Get Ready

  • Request Customs Declaration Service data on imports

  • UK Trade Tariff: volume 3 for CDS

  • Safety and security requirements on imports and exports

  • Refunds and waivers on customs debt by HMRC

  • Making an entry summary declaration

  • Transit: UK makes changes from 1 August 2022. What you need to know

  • A UK-Africa trading partnership for the 21st century

  • UK-New Zealand FTA: advice from Trade and Agriculture Commission

  • Trade remedies notices: tariff-rate quotas on steel goods

  • Republic of Belarus sanctions:

  • Notice to Importers 2952: Belarus import sanctions

  • Import prohibitions in force on certain goods originating or consigned from Belarus

  • Financial sanctions, Belarus

  • Guidance on the Republic of Belarus (Sanctions) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019

  • Trading under sanctions with Russia

  • Russia sanctions: guidance

  • Financial sanctions, Russia

  • Financial sanctions, Cyber

  • Financial Sanctions, Burundi

  • Financial sanctions, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

 
Customs

After 30 September 2022, businesses will no longer be able to make import declarations on the Customs Handling of Import and Export Freight (CHIEF). To continue trading, from 1 October businesses will need to make their import declarations on the Customs Declaration Service. The last day for making export declarations on CHIEF will be 31 March 2023, when CHIEF will close.


During a customs audit, HMRC keeps records of actual data entered and raises duties on imports that were not recorded in the trader's records but were actually declared to customs. This can occur when an agent fails to make the proper declaration. It is your responsibility to correctly declare goods, and your agent bears only minor liability. Due to the number of different locations and agents, larger traders with multi-site operations may find it difficult to keep import records.

Data from the Customs Declaration Service simplifies and improves the accuracy of your records. For example, by providing precise figures for the total amount of duty paid in relation to the value of goods entered.


Find the guidance, codes and procedures to use when importing or exporting goods when using the Customs Declaration Service (CDS). ,A new collection of information and instructions relating to Final Supplementary Declarations (FSD) has been added


Find out about new safety and security requirements that apply to goods entering and exiting Great Britain.


Find out about repayment and remission of customs duties by HMRC and how to apply. Guidance about how to apply has been updated


If you are moving goods into Great Britain, into Northern Ireland from Great Britain, or into Northern Ireland from outside the EU, you’ll need to make an entry summary declaration. The section ‘Before you submit a declaration’ has been updated with information on when the new import controls regime will be introduced. When using the Goods Vehicle Movement Service, the inclusion of any safety and security declaration reference numbers is an optional step.


 
Transit

Common Transit Convention Movements for exports guidance changes from 1 August 2022. From 1 August you can no longer input a transit Movement Reference Number (MRN) in a Goods Movement Reference (GMR) for an outbound transit movement from Great Britain, unless you are an authorised consignor or consignee (ACC).

 
FTA

Speech delivered by the International Trade Secretary at Invest Africa’s Africa Debate, at the Guildhall in London on the UK’s trade relationship with Africa.


Summary: The UK is responding to the Continent's growth story with a bold trade strategy for Africa. The strategy will explore how our businesses can support them through projects that create jobs, and support inclusion and sustainability. It will also look at how we use trade's power to strengthen the rules-based order. It's also about opening up new opportunities for UK businesses to trade with one of the most dynamic parts of the world. And it's about the UK helping to power African growth, both today and tomorrow, through its expertise and ideas. There are huge opportunities for us to achieve even more together, and I hope to visit Africa soon in the near future, to see this productive investment partnership in action. The need to ensure the free trade of goods and services is one of the key elements of the UK-Africa trading partnership. We have signed no fewer than nine trade agreements with 18 African nations since the UK left the EU, and we're working on many more. Last year, the UK became the first non-African country to sign an agreement with the Free Trade Area Secretariat. Access to new markets helps build strong businesses. Strong businesses generate prosperity for the whole country here to. By establishing closer trading links with African countries – we will open our economy to some of the most forward-looking and entrepreneurial countries on earth. Access to new markets helps build strong businesses, which in turn creates jobs and strengthens the UK economy. But there are still some countries on the outside looking in – effectively barred from all these benefits. These nations might have natural resources and talent but their path to prosperity is blocked by poverty, conflict and exploitative models. That's why we're going to introduce two initiatives which we hope will help.


Advice from Trade and Agriculture Commission (TAC) to the Secretary of State for International Trade on measures in the UK-New Zealand Free Trade Agreement (FTA). This independent report sets out advice from the Trade and Agriculture Commission on whether measures in the UK-New Zealand FTA are consistent with the maintenance of UK levels of statutory protection in relation to: animal or plant life or health, animal welfare environmental protections.


 
ADD,CVD etc

Trade remedies notices relating to the tariff-rate quotas on steel goods. Removed ‘Trade remedies notice 2021/01: safeguard measure: tariff-rate quota on steel goods’, and in ‘Trade remedies notice 2021/03’ updated ‘This notice was originally published on 30 June 2021 with effect from 1 July 2021.’ so it reads: ‘This notice was originally published on 30 June 2021 with effect from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022

 
Sanctions

Republic of Belarus sanctions:


Summary: Prohibitions on the export, supply, delivery, making available and transfer of dual-use goods and technology to Belarus. This also applies to related technical assistance, financial services, funds and brokering services. Expanded definition of 'potash' and new prohibition on import of mineral products.


Import prohibitions in force on certain goods originating or consigned from Belarus imported into the UK, including Northern Ireland.

Summary: The Republic of Belarus (Sanctions) (EU Exit) (Amendment) Regulations 2022 amended the 2019 regulations. This amendment extends the existing import sanctions measures by prohibiting the import of arms and related materiel and iron and steel products. It also extends the ban on certain mineral products and potash. The ban also prohibits the provision of technical assistance, financial services and funds and brokering services relating to these products.


Belarus is currently subject to UK financial sanctions. This document provides a current list of designated persons. Updated with HM Treasury Notice, Belarus, 07/07/2022


Guidance on the Republic of Belarus (Sanctions) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019

Guidance amended to reflect the provisions in the Republic of Belarus (Sanctions) (EU Exit) (Amendment) Regulations 2022.


What import and export restrictions apply due to sanctions for UK companies when trading with Russia. Additional schedules and definitions were added to the export and import ban sections following the passing of Amendment No. 10 of Russia (Sanctions) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019


Guidance on the Russia (Sanctions) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019

Guidance updated to clarify the application of the prohibition on providing insurance and reinsurance services in relation to aviation and space goods and technology.


The Russia (Sanctions) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 ensure sanctions relating to Russia are effectively implemented. Updated with Latest HM Treasury Notice, Russia, 05/07/2022


UK financial sanctions are in place for persons, entities or bodies involved in certain cyber activity.This page contains the current list of designated targets. Updated with Latest HM Treasury Notice, Cyber, 05/07/2022


Burundi is currently subject to UK financial sanctions. This document provides a current list of designated persons.

Updated Burundi regulations


Financial sanctions, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) is subject to UK financial sanctions regime. This document contains a current list of designated persons.


 


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